Pontiac Collector Wants To Open A Pontiac Museum In Pontiac, Michigan

That’s a whole lot of love for the defunct GM brand.

Over 10 years ago, Pontiac officially went out of business leaving a dent in American automotive history. A huge Pontiac fan wants to honor the marque’s legacy by opening a museum dedicated to Pontiac vehicles (and other GM classics). The location? In Pontiac, Michigan, of course.

The Pontiac Transportation Museum has already acquired a 55,000 square-foot building to become its site. It’s an old grade school building, which will be repurposed and re-developed to include vehicle and artifact display galleries, a theater, research library, classrooms, and restoration spaces. 

Gallery: Pontiac Transportation Museum








Documented in the upcoming museum’s website (see source link below), the museum is pegged to become a facility to host special events, vehicle shows/conventions, business meetings, and other community events. There will also be a museum store for Pontiac merchandise.

According to the museum’s progress report as of October 2020, the building already has 45 vehicles. This has already increased, though, as Tim Dye, the man behind the Pontiac-inspired museum, told Detroit Free Press that he already amassed 55 cars for the museum; he owns 12 of the Pontiac models. The current lineup of vehicles also includes classic vehicles that etched a mark in the automotive history of the City of Pontiac.

Dye hopes to attract around 50,000 visitors a year, with a projected public opening this year. Of course, funding is one of the hurdles for this grand opening, citing the current COVID-19 pandemic as one of the biggest difficulties in organizing fundraisers. The facade renderings above should give you an idea of the possible final looks of the redeveloped building.

In September, Dye hopes to raise awareness about the museum via the Motor Bella outdoor auto show in Michigan and eventually, find more people to fund the project.

Sources:

Detroit Free Press via GM Authority, Pontiac Transportation Museum

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