Avadar Tackles Entry-Level E-MTB Segment With C3 Sport

Avadar is an up and coming American e-bike brand that’s been around since 2017. Ever since they hit the market, they’ve been hard at work in getting more and more people to try their bikes. With their competitive prices, accessible features, and standard mountain bike geometries, Avadar’s e-bikes make for solid all-rounders, be it in the city or on the trails.

One of the brand’s newest bikes, the C3 Sport, is the embodiment of just that, and it offers a no-frills e-MTB experience for both novice and intermediate riders. For starters, it’s made out of a basic aluminum hardtail frame, and judging by the looks of the bike as a whole, it’s designed as a leisurely cross country machine, not intended to tackle any jumps or difficult technical trails. Instead, the C3 Sport is more at home taking it easy on moderate single tracks and commuting to and from work or school. That said, the terrain you ride on is made more manageable by a 100mm suspension fork.

From a performance standpoint, the Avadar C3 Pro packs a rather decent punch. It’s fitted with a mid-drive electric motor that provides a continuous output of 250 watts and 80 Nm of torque. A such, the bike is more than capable of turning that dreaded climb into a stroll in the park. Furthermore, a bunch of optional luggage extras allow you to transform the C3 Pro into an urban assault machine, with the motor being more than up to the task. As for range, you can expect around 60 miles on a single charge from the bike’s integrated removable battery on the downtube.

Supplementing the electric motor is a basic albeit reliable 2×8 drivetrain from none other than Shimano. Furthermore, entry-level Shimano hydraulic brakes put this bike to a confident stop, and are certainly a lot more efficient and pleasing to use than standard cable-actuated disc brakes. Overall, you’re looking at an electric bicycle that tips the scales at 25 kilograms—not that heavy, but certainly not light. For south of $2,000, however, it’s hard to fault this bike.

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